Office Clothes That Are Actually Super Comfortable

The Everygirl’s product selections are curated by the editorial team. If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission, at no cost to you. We only recommend products we genuinely love.






Source: Abercrombie & Fitch

There was a time in my life when I wholeheartedly believed that comfort and office clothes were mutually exclusive. If I was heading to the office, that meant that I was sporting a stiff pair of slacks, shoving my feet into a far-too-small pair of pointed-toe heels, and staring at a closet of clothes that I absolutely dreaded putting on in the morning.

Though no one asked for it, 2020 introduced a lot of us to the previously foreign concept of working from home. For me, that included being introduced to the idea that if I didn’t want to wear pants while brainstorming my next project, I simply didn’t have to. After a over a year of rocking oversized college sweatshirts, my coziest joggers, and rotating between two of my favorite pairs of slippers, I am on a mission to find office-appropriate attire that makes me look put together but still feel like I’m rocking one of my go-to WFH outfit formulas. If you’re on the hunt for office-friendly attire that you could just as easily work in as you could nap in, these low-maintenance, comfy AF office clothes have your back:

 

Blouses, tees, and knit tops:

While I’ll always reach for my oversized Tybee Island tourist tee before anything else, on days when we’ll be back in the office, I’ll be opting for flowy blouses, comfy fitted tees, cozy knit tops, and oversized button-up shirts that I’ll actually look forward to being in all day long. 





Madewell

Cotton Crewneck

6 colors available

Shop it now





Madewell

Flutter Sleeve Tee

2 colors available

Shop it now





Aritzia

Oversized Button Up

3 colors available

Shop it now





Madewell

Button-Front Sweater Tee

Shop it now





H&M

V-Neck Blouse

2 colors available

Shop it now

 

No-hassle dresses and skirts:

Not only are dresses and skirts a super low-maintenance pick for a morning of running late, but they also happen to be a super comfortable solution as opposed to tight slacks or work-appropriate jeans (the horror!). Flowy dresses and skirts are the keys to looking cute with minimal effort (read: it’s about as close to working from home sans pants as we’re going to get).





H&M

Ribbed Shirt Dress

Shop it now





Madewell

Tiered Mini Dress

2 colors available

Shop it now





Madewell

Midi Slip Skirt

Shop it now





Madewell

Knotted Midi Skirt

Shop it now

 

Oversized blazers and cozy sweaters:

When we’re working somewhere that’s not our home, we don’t have the liberty to crank up the heat, swaddle ourselves in our comfiest Barefoot Dreams blanket, or control the A.C. as we normally would. Next to bringing our snowsuit, incorporating layers in the form of oversized blazers and cozy sweaters is the perfect way to make sure that we’re comfortable in the office, no matter what the office thermostat is set at.





Halogen

Open Front Blazer

2 colors available

Shop it now





Halogen

Plus Size Open Blazer

Shop it now





Madewell

V-Neck Cardigan

2 colors available

Shop it now





Madewell

Plaid Blazer

Shop it now





Madewell

Polo Sweater

Shop it now





Banana Republic

Chunky Knit Cardigan

3 colors available

Shop it now

 

Linen trousers and relaxed pants:

After months and months of wearing our comfiest joggers, we simply can’t fathom slipping into our most structured, restrictive pair of slacks like we used to. Though it’s not professionally acceptable to rock our favorite cotton trousers in the office (one can dream), we can reach for linen trousers and relaxed, stretchy pants, which are the next best thing.





Halogen

Relaxed Crop Pants

2 colors available

Shop it now





Eloquii

Plus Size Trousers

12 colors available

Shop it now





H&M

Linen Pants

3 colors available

Shop it now

 

Broken-in loafers and leather sneakers:

I’ll miss wearing my slippers more than I’ll miss most things about working from home, so when we return to the office, I’ll have my leather loafers and office-approved sneakers broken in and ready to go. To my slippers, it’s not a “goodbye,” it’s a “we’ll reunite after 5:30 p.m. and I’ll see you later.” Until then, we’ll be strutting through the city in these comfortable alternatives.





Madewell

Leather Mules

Shop it now





Madewell

Leather Loafers

2 colors available

Shop it now





Sam Edelman

Leather Sneaker

4 colors available

Shop it now

 

 

The Lazy Girl’s Guide to Looking Cute This Summer

READ ON

7 Toxic Relationship Habits That Seem Perfectly Normal






Source: Lightfield Studios | Shutterstock

We took chemistry, algebra, and P.E., but there was no class in school on how to be in a successful relationship (off-topic side note: have you used calculus in your life, like, at all? Just saying). There was no “How to Not be a Shitty Partner 101,” or a crash course in finding a relationship that makes you happy. So instead, we got all our relationship advice, expectations, and teen spirit wisdom from every 16-year-old girl’s god: Nicholas Sparks. Or maybe for you it was the “you complete me” magic of Tom Cruise, the will-they-or-wont-they of Ross and Rachel, or the passionate love-hate relationship between Mike Chadway and news producer Abby in The Ugly Truth.

Here’s the real ugly truth: toxic relationship habits are not only normal in our society, but are worshipped. Passionate love stories become blockbuster hits, screaming matches turned steamy make-outs become cinematic gold (à la The Notebook), and the idea of “love” becomes all-consuming, all-or-nothing, and “happily-ever-after.” The things that really make a relationship good, stable, and fulfilling are not very exciting, nor do they sell well or feel dramatic enough for the big screen, which is why we often confuse “love” with toxic behavior, and assume frogs are Prince Charmings. Here are habits that seem normal, but might be damaging your relationship (and what to do instead):

 

1. Expecting your partner to “fix” any emotional distress

Be honest: how many times have you been in a fight about your partner not being there for you during a tough time or not being sympathetic enough about your bad day? Have you built up resentment because your partner wasn’t as emotionally there for you as you “needed?” While it’s important to seek support and partnership with your significant other, there’s a big difference between being supportive and being emotionally obligated. You should be adding to each other’s lives without feeling like either of you depend on the other.

 

What to do instead

Yes, in a healthy relationship, you would be able to ask your partner, “This feels hard to do alone. Can you help me to get through this?” But the key word is ask. Vocalize how you’d like your partner to show up for you and how you’re feeling, without expecting or relying on them to “fix” anything. Take responsibility for your own emotions, without expecting them to hold responsibility for your happiness.

 

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by KAYLA SEAH (@kayla_seah)

 

2. Prioritizing fairness

Obviously, fairness sounds like an admirable quality. But in relationships, “fairness” can look a lot like keeping score. If you find yourself mentally computing the effort your partner puts in and how it relates to the effort you put in, or if either of you are retaliating hurt feelings by bringing up past arguments, this could be a sign that one or both of you are more focused on keeping score than keeping the relationship healthy. Your relationship should not come with a scorecard that tallies up who has screwed up the most or who owes the other more.

 

What to do instead

Relationships do not have to be “fair” in order to be good. If you live together, reevaluate your chore chart: it doesn’t have to be “equal” (like “I cooked, so you have to do the dishes,” or “I took the dog for a walk yesterday, so you have to do it today”). Instead, offer to do the chores you know your partner really doesn’t like to do that you don’t mind, and vice versa. Think about what makes sense for both of your lifestyles, not what is equal, and treat every problem or disagreement like it’s brand new, without bringing up past issues.

 

3. Believing your partner is your “second half”

Back to that “you complete me” load of crap–no one (and I mean no one) can live a fulfilled life with the belief that they need someone else to make them whole. When you don’t feel “whole” without them, of course you won’t want to have your own hobbies, friendships, and alone time (crucial for a truly healthy relationship), or may feel like you literally would not live without them so you feel insecure when they’re out of your site out of fear of losing them. This mentality can lead to toxic dynamics like codependency, insecurity, and controlling behavior.

 

What to do instead

Look at your partner as someone who enriches and adds to your already complete life. Focus on yourself more often than you focus on the relationship, and seek out what makes you happy. Then get ready to share your joy with your significant other, instead of expecting them to be the sole source of your joy. 

 

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Calle y Poché (@calleypoche)

 

4. Speaking in absolutes

Picture this: instead of saying, “What you just said hurt my feelings,” you say, “I could never be with someone who says such awful things!” Instead of “Your reaction to what I said made me feel unheard” you say, “I deserve someone who listens to me and cares about my feelings!” Or maybe you go with the classic, “You never pick up the slack!” or “You always ignore what I’m saying…” Sound familiar? When speaking in absolutes, you’re creating expectations for the relationship based on your own “ideals” that actually have nothing to do with your partner. You may be trying to make a point about the specific instance, but you’re inadvertently telling them they don’t deserve you or that all of the times they do listen to you or show they love you don’t matter. A singular problem that can be communicated and resolved then becomes a greater statement about your overall relationship. 

 

What to do instead

In general, stop relating with your significant other based on what they could be and accept who they are. Focus solely on the problem at hand. Don’t generalize your partner’s actions, and vocalize why they hurt you in that moment, rather than why you don’t accept them as a worthy enough partner. Avoid phrases like “never” or “always,” and instead address every issue as a singular problem instead of throwing out overarching accusations. 

 

5. Intense conflict means passion

We all love the classic rom-dram The Notebook, complete with screaming matches that turn into passionate sex scenes (I know you’ve searched for the Youtube clip of that scene!). But “passion” that results in consistent fights or screaming matches off-screen are always rooted in deeper problems like immaturity, difficulties with communication, or even traits of relationship abuse like narcissism or control (no matter how good the “make up” is). Regardless of what causes consistent fighting, it makes for an unsustainable relationship, resulting in eventual burn-out. The truth is that love should feel gentle. You should be more consistent in your relationship than you are up and down, and you should feel more content than heated or angry.

 

What to do instead

Rewire the way the two of you deal with problems. Think of the issue as you two against the problem, instead of each of you against each other. Also, focus on your partner’s emotions, rather than their words, which will limit the ability to get caught up when something is said out of anger or frustration. Start expressing gratitude for the traits about your relationship and partner that have nothing to do with “passion” at all: their kindness, how they’re there for you, how you two share the same interests, etc.

 

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by MISS ENOCHA (@missenocha)

 

6. Dropping “hints”

So maybe you “accidentally” left up a browser page of a certain pair of earrings you’re dying for when you borrowed your S.O.’s laptop, or maybe you mention how an ex complimented you more as a way to get your current significant other to compliment you more. Perhaps you even drop hints about bigger life changes, whether it’s talking about a couple who moved in together and they seem really happy, or that your mom was asking you when you were getting married. While a gift here and there is harmless, dropping “hints” about other areas of your relationship instead of communicating what you need and want can be toxic and damaging. If you can’t openly communicate your feelings or desires, whether it’s I wish you complimented me more, or I’d like to try something new in bed, your communication needs some work.

 

What to do instead

Be up front and open about your feelings, desires, and needs. Never lead with false hopes that your partner will be able to assume what you want, and value open communication in your relationship. Make it clear that your partner is not obligated to fulfill your needs. Rather, you’d appreciate their effort or support, and don’t be judgmental, unreceptive, or dismissive with anything they communicate to you.

 

7. Believing in the idea of “soulmates”

Another Box Office belief that had me believing in Prince Charming since I first watched Cinderella is the magical idea of a “soulmate” or finding The One perfect person out there for you. But the problem with believing in a soulmate is that you could be spending your life measuring your partner in terms of what they aren’t, rather than what they are: any flaw that comes up (and they will, because everyone has flaws) might make you doubt their soulmate status (is someone even more perfect for you out there?). I’m not saying you won’t find someone who checks off every box on your checklist, or who won’t love you bigger and greater and kinder than you ever knew to wait for (in fact, I truly believe love is not worth having unless it’s that). But it’s the way we think about commitment that makes all the difference.

 

What to do instead

Think of commitment as a choice, rather than “destiny.” To help distinguish the difference between “settling” and being over-critical, ask yourself whether or not you would want your children to be like them or whether or not you’d feel happy with them even during hard or boring times, instead of whether or not they’re “perfect” for you. View your relationship as a choice that both of you decide to be in every day, and don’t look at every flaw as a possibility that there’s someone better for you out there. 

 

10 Simple Ways to Improve Your Relationship by the End of the Day

READ NOW

 

I’m a Vegetarian and My S.O. Isn’t—Here’s What We Eat






Source: @blueapron

Cooking is my love language. Some people give gifts and some people write love letters, but I cook. Though my boyfriend knows a thing or two about roasting veggies and makes a mean pasta sauce, I like to do the cooking because it’s the way I take care of the people I love. It’s an activity I look forward to all day long, and let’s be honest, I’m just way better than he is (he’s better at doing the dishes, so win-win!). However, every meal I make is vegetarian. I’ve never eaten meat in my life (nope, not once!), so I wouldn’t even know what to do with a chicken breast, and I couldn’t tell you the difference between an oyster and a clam. My boyfriend grew up on chicken wings and steak, so I knew his adjustment to my plant-based lifestyle would not necessarily be seamless. 

While every relationship is different, having dinner is something we like to do together. Eating together is our special ritual; I like to cook for him, and we hang out in the kitchen to catch up on our days. While many couples prefer to eat separate meals (especially when they have different dietary needs), I’ve found ways to make my cooking style work for both of our preferences, so I recorded my meals through an entire week of dinners from Sunday to Thursday (you best believe Friday is reserved for sushi takeout!). Read on for my tips, tricks, and recipes for cooking dinner as a vegetarian for my meat-loving boyfriend. 

 

Sunday: Pasta Night





My boyfriend and I are both Italian, so pasta is the natural go-to in our house. Seriously, there have been weeks where we have same kind of pasta every single night. It’s a good Sunday meal because it’s easy, simple, and delicious. Plus, whether or not you eat meat, everybody loves pasta, right? For plant-based options, I use quinoa, brown rice, or chickpea pasta, or I’ll make spaghetti squash. As for sauce, I love a homemade pesto or quick marinara, but I’ve also been known to get adventurous by adding avocado or hearts of palm to make a vegan “pasta alfredo” (at this point, my boyfriend has stopped asking what’s in the sauce). Don’t forget a simple side salad!  

 

Monday: Korean Savory Pancakes





The secret to getting your significant other to eat less meat? Get adventurous. Since I love to cook and try new foods, I make sure to experiment with different flavors and learn about different diets I would not otherwise be exposed to. In other words, my boyfriend is never bored. I was inspired by a recipe from Bonberi of bin dae tteok, or savory mung bean pancakes, which is a traditional Korean dish. Due to lack of time, I replaced mung beans with chickpea flour (very untraditional) and put together these delicious and dip-able pancakes in under 20 minutes. Trust me, he’s not missing his steak dinners. 

 

Tuesday: Fried Egg Tacos





Pro tip: If you live with someone who has totally different dietary preferences, taco night is the way to go. They’re easily customizable, and all you have to do is prepare a few different toppings and a couple of different fillers. I’ll fill mine with veggies and beans, but my boyfriend can add any kind of meat to his if he’s craving some extra protein. Another favorite hack is to top quesadillas or tacos with a fried egg for extra flavor and protein. I love using eggs for dinner as a protein we both can eat. 

 

Wednesday: Blue Apron Meal for Two









And now for my best cooking-for-two-different-diets hack: Blue Apron. Let’s be honest, yes, I love cooking, but I don’t always have time to meal plan, grocery shop, and DIY an entire meal from scratch. I think of Blue Apron as an investment in our relationship because we both can get what we want. Sometimes the vegetarian option is so delicious and filling that my boyfriend doesn’t even realize there wasn’t any meat. But when he is craving some chicken, steak, or seafood, Blue Apron offers the ability to have two separate proteins for the same recipe, so I’ll add tofu and he’ll add pork—no separate meal required. 

Sign up for Blue Apron to get up to 14 free meals!

 

Thursday: Asparagus Soup





Some nights, I cook something that may not be filling enough for my boyfriend, so he’ll plan ahead to make his own meat if he wants something extra. Tonight, I was craving soup (it was a rare occurrence, I swear), so I prepared a thick asparagus soup and topped it off with pumpkin seeds and toasted baguette. Bonus life hack: Throw any soup into the blender, and it’ll immediately taste richer and creamier, even if it’s totally vegan. While that was enough for me, my boyfriend roasted some chicken for himself to eat with the soup. Bottom line is, if you have a meat-loving significant other or your roommate is fully plant-based while you can’t give up bacon, any vegetarian main meal can be turned into a side dish for a meat-lover. 

 

Super Simple Vegetarian Trader Joe’s Recipes
that anyone can make!
READ NOW

 







This post contains a sponsored inclusion of Blue Apron, but all of the opinions within are those of The Everygirl editorial board.